Sergio Marchionne, the chief executive officer of both Chrysler Group LLC and Fiat S.p.A, discussed Chrysler's U.S. sales as well as the status of the Sterling Heights (Mich.) Assembly Plant during a photo op for the visit of the Italian Economic Development Minister to Chrysler World Headquarters in Auburn Hills, Mich. The audio's sketchy since this was not a formal news conference and the folks weren't wearing mics. Videos and transcripts below:

Transcript regarding September sales:

"On the issue of Chrysler I think that one of the things you need to be absolutely careful about is that when you start looking at market share data, for any of the automotive producers in the U.S., there are a number of things that have impacted on market share, volumes in the month of September. We have just come off a substantial inducement to consumption that was associated with the Cash for Clunkers program, and that in and by itself is a disturbance that, at least from Chrysler’s standpoint, one, was unexpected and was announced at a time in which our industrial machine was just about ready to get started up and running.

"Effectively, most of our plants had been out for a substantial part of the spring and part of the summer; and the machines had not come back on until the end of July. Secondly, this process that we’re going through, and we have been through this on the Fiat side. When I arrived in 2004 we had to go through the same type of painful process of watching market share decline as we cleaned up our commercial practices in the field. And so a lot of the inducements that were being offered in the marketplace by American car manufacturers are beginning to disappear. So the heavy incentive checks that one could find in most dealers are no longer available, the discipline required to maintain pricing in order to stay profitable in the car making business, the benefits of that philosophy are beginning to work their way through, we are not the only ones that are adopting this structure ourselves, General Motors has become a lot more disciplined on this than we have been.

"That is bound initially to cause a contraction of the position because your starting point was exaggerated and so you need to work through this process of cleansing; it’s painful it looks ugly, people sit back and say ‘what are you going to do to try and incentivize the demand, the real issue is that we need to go back to making products that people want at a price that is accessible and defensible in a competitive framework. All the work that has gone on here since we came in on June 10 has been geared at providing the framework to effectively drive volume over the medium to long term.

"September is not an indication of future performance, I’m not apologizing for it, it is the consequence of a number of actions that were taken in the past, all of which have culminated in the month of September – you may see similar numbers in October, I don’t know. Our intention is to improve share from this point on, but I don’t get alarmed. The machine is timed, we’re not bleeding as people think we are, the level of cost consciousness at this house is probably at a historical high, the real important issue is to try and build a future. And I would just ask you to wait until November and you can see it. The future is a lot a lot better than the market share in September would indicate."

Sergio Marchionne Discusses the Sterling Heights Assembly Plant

Transcript:

"There was a decision that was made at the time in which Chrysler filed for bankruptcy that was part of a production plan that excluded Sterling Heights from continuing operations, at Chrysler going forward. That view has not changed. I’ve read the speculation in the press, I’ve seen some people get incredibly excited about the fact that we’re about ready to change our mind. I can tell you right now I have no plans on my desk that would suggest that the decision is going to be reversed.  I think that we need to look at a variety of factors before commitments like this are made, it was part of a very thorough understanding of a manufacturing footprint that Chrysler had, so I don’t want anybody to start building up unfulfilled expectations, I think we need to be careful and I think we need to walk before we start running here. I don’t know if I can be any clearer.

"If there is anything that needs to be done in connection with that plant, it certainly needs to be discussed first and foremost with the national leadership of the UAW. I understand the local interest in this issue, but I think we have a number of exchanges and commitments made with Ron Gettlefinger of the UAW and I think that he is the first and foremost interface in the process."